Credit Features - Frequently Asked Questions Back to MyTrustedID Account

What is credit monitoring?
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TrustedID's credit monitoring service provides you a comprehensive view of your credit history along with daily alerts to keep you up-to-date on any changes to your credit reports. These alerts are based on information that lenders and businesses pass on to the credit bureaus - the companies that maintain your credit reports. We check your credit report every day, and when information is added or changed, we will send you an email alert asking you to sign into your MyTrustedID account, where you will be able to see the details of the alert and verify that the information is correct.
How can credit monitoring help protect against identity theft?
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By carefully checking your credit report, you may be able to spot fraud and put an end to it quickly. Look through your report for any addresses or credit accounts (loans, credit cards, store charge cards, etc.) that you don't recognize. If something doesn't look familiar, contact our Customer Care Agents at 1.888.548.7878 immediately. They will help you determine if you are a victim of identity theft and take the necessary steps to secure yourself. For more information about reviewing your credit reports, see the "Instructions for Spotting Identity Theft in your Credit Reports" in your Protection Pack.
Why is my credit monitoring "Not Activated"?
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Before we show you your credit report and score and set up your alerts, we need you to answer a few simple questions to verify your identity. This additional security step is design to prevent fraudulent access to your personal and sensitive credit information. To activate your credit monitoring, click on "Activate Credit Alerts" or "Activate Report & Score" to the right of your service status bars and answer the questions there to verify your identity. When you have successfully verified your identity, you will receive immediate access to your credit report and score, and start receiving alerts.
How recently updated are my credit report and score?
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Your credit report and score are current as of the date you activated your credit monitoring service. All changes to your credit report after that date will be listed in the "Alerts" section of your MyTrustedID Credit Report & Score page, so you will always have up-to-date information on your current credit report.
I have new alerts - what should I do?
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When you receive a new alert, you will see a purple status bar in the "Credit Monitoring" section of your MyTrustedID protection overview along with a link to "View Alerts". Click on that link, and on the next page click on the "Credit Report & Score" link. Under the "Alerts" section you will see all your new alerts. Review these carefully and make sure the information matches what you know about your recent credit history. If something doesn't look familiar, contact our Customer Care Agents at 1.888.548.7878 immediately. They will help you determine if you are a victim of identity theft and take the necessary steps to secure yourself. For more information about frequent credit alerts and what they mean, see "Understanding Your Credit Report Alerts" in your Protection Pack.
What if I spot an error on my credit report?
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If something doesn't look familiar, contact our Customer Care Agents at 1.888.548.7878 immediately. They will help you determine if you are a victim of identity theft and take the necessary steps to secure yourself. Because you may not always recognize the information at first, it is always important to carefully review your credit report and alerts. Your credit report may contain information on joint accounts that you hold or loans that you co-signed with a family member or business partner. Sometimes, your credit alerts may seem like they represent something that happened a long time in the past. This delay or repetition of information can happen when a creditor sells or transfers your account to another lender, or starts to report your information to a different credit bureau.
What information shows up in my credit alerts?
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Your credit alerts include any additions and changes that are made to your credit reports, such as a new credit card being opened or a bankruptcy being reported. These types of changes can be early indicators that someone has stolen your name or Social Security number and is using them to get credit in your name. Regular activity with your credit cards or loans, such as a new charge or a payment received, does not affect your credit report and will not trigger an alert.
What information shows up in my credit report?
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Your credit report contains information on most major areas of your financial identity. It includes information on where you live, the credit cards and loans you have, how much debt you owe, whether you have paid your bills on time, and whether you've been sued or filed for bankruptcy. All of this information is supplied to the credit bureaus by companies and lenders with whom you have accounts and by federal, state, and local courts.
What does my credit score mean?
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Your credit score is a number created by a credit bureau or other agency that measures your likelihood of repaying a loan, based on your past payment history and how you manage your credit. The higher the number, the likelier you are to repay. Many lenders and businesses use this score to determine your eligibility for a loan or line of credit – the higher your score, the more likely you are to receive credit.
What determines my credit score?
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While the credit bureaus won't disclose the exact formula behind their scores, the basics of it are fairly simple. In order of importance, here are the main factors that determine your credit score:

1. Payment History - The factor that has the biggest impact on your score is whether you've paid past credit accounts on time.

2. Amount of Debt - Having loans or maintaining a credit card balance is not necessarily bad, but owing a lot of money can suggest that you are overextended and more likely to make some payments late or not at all.

3. Length of Credit History - In general, the longer your history of having credit, the higher your credit score will be. A long history indicates that you are responsible in managing your credit over time.

4. New Credit - Opening several loans or credit cards - or even just applying for them - in a short period of time can indicate greater risk, especially if you have a short credit history.

5. Types of Credit - A healthy mix of types of credit - credit cards, store charge cards, finance company accounts, mortgages and other loans - can indicate that lenders trust you and you are responsibly managing your credit.

Customer Care Agents

Your protection specialists are standing by to answer your questions and to protect your identity.

Hours: 9 AM - 8 PM Monday to Friday Central Time

Phone: 1.888.548.7878

Email: